Category Archives: First Aid

Dog Bee Stings – How To Treat

siri-daisy-bee-59353319Woozers, do I have a whole new respect for those funny looking bugs flying around with wings extended and a determined look on their face. I only have one question, what did I ever do to make a bee mad at me?

Okay, so I may have trampled a few during my run around the yard each day, but it wasn’t intentional. Do you have any idea how hard it is to run at warp speed while looking at the grown?

Well let me tell you, this bee sting really hurt and it STILL hurts. It could have been worse, he could have stung me on my nose.   I did get my hair done today and Amanda, my groomer could not find the stinger.

Mom and Dad looked but could not find it, so hopefully my paw will stop hurting soon. Just as soon as we find a way of reviving Mom and getting her off the floor (she is such a wimp), I’m sure I am in for a veterinarian visit.

So of course I had to do some research on the subject. Well actually, Aunt Judy did this research for me (Mom’s sitting up now, so I think she is coming around.) Thank you Aunt Judy.

So, remember to hit the print button and put this post in your doggie first aid file. You do have one of those – right? Mom keeps ours in the top drawer of her master filing cabinet, right in the front, before the ABC’s start, because the information is so important. Even the hanging file folder is even red.

Stings from wasps, bees, yellow jackets and ant bites will all cause redness and painful swelling at the site. They will usually only sting on exposed non-fur areas. Gee, they must (wait for it) bee lazy little critters. Seriously, being stung can be a serious situation and I shouldn’t be (oh man, that was so hard not to do) making light of it. This is really interesting, the swelling can also occur in the face and neck area, even though the dog was not stung in those areas.

If your dog is stung many times (I can’t even imagine how that must feel) the absorbed toxins could cause anaphylactic (phew, that is a big word for such a little tyke) shock, especially if the dog has been stung in the past. Continue reading

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Dog Skin Conditions-Let The Itch Begin

seriously - I'm real - 199-181Dog Skin Conditions  – Let The Itch Begin, yep, that is about all I can say about it right now.

On Monday it was 60 degrees where I live. Yesterday it was in the upper 70’s and I played outside with Princess and Coco for hours.  It was total enjoyment. Last night when I went out for my midnight-run, it was in the low 30’s and snow flakes were a-fly-in!

Now I’m not the smartest paw on these four legs, but I do know chaos when I experience it, and trust me, the weather is in total chaos right now. There are only four words to describe it – let the itch begin!

Doggie skin conditions can be pawblematic to diagnose and even more pawblematic to resolve. Finding the cause of our constant itching is crucial because it is irritating us (and most likely you) to no end. How would you like to wake up a pawzillion times a night scratching? Okay, I’ll admit it, if your dog sleeps with you like I do with Mom and Dad, when we itch and scratch at night you most likely wake from the pounding on the bed. Sorry, when you’ve got an itch, you gotta scratch it. Just ask your pooch and they will tell you –  that’s the truth.

Skin conditions in dogs can range from small hot spots to their entire coat falling out and their skin turning black. Continue reading

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Dog Flu – Could Your Dog Get It?

200x200-bigboyhaircut-sirtitan, SirTitan.comAhhh-chew!  Oh, excuse me. I didn’t realize you were here already.  Mom had that killer flu two weeks ago and I sure hope I’m not getting it. What!!! You didn’t know dogs could catch the flu? Well truthfully, neither did I until I started researching this post.

Yes, There is a Dog Flu – H3N8
We even have our own personal flu. It is called H3N8 and the research says it is highly contagious among dogs.   H3N8 can make us very sick and can cause serious respiratory problems. There is one good thing to know, our flu cannot be transmitted to our humans.

In 2003 the first case of dog flu was in Florida (I hope cousin Polar is okay, he lives in Florida. I think I will call him tonight.) Since then over twenty-five states have reported dogs with the flu.

It is really scary for us because the majoriety of our human parents don’t know that we can even get the flu. The canine influenza virus is pretty new, so the dog community has not developed a natural immunity to it. Just about every dog Continue reading

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